Monday, 24 March 2014

Identity

These days, we hear much about radicalism. Within the world of Christian Science, I was radical in my reliance on it. I continued the parental example of radical reliance, to which I was exposed. My mother was radical in that she lived and breathed Christian Science - no room for flexibility in her world! No doctors, pain relief, talk of health issues nor exposure to anything "worldly". Total reliance on Christian Science! In years gone by, to be radical was not much spoken about.

To my mind,  a question is posed - did my mother have that kind of personality which was attracted to strong-mindedness, no compromise and literal interpretation of Science and Health by Mary Baker Eddy? Or, was it solely Christian Science which encouraged her radicalism to develop? Does radicalism of belief foster a false sense of security in day to day life? And is that what she was searching for - some kind of security? That, in a topsy-turvey world all around her, there was something on which to depend?

Within that framework, did I have the potential within my personality to become radical, within a belief system, or did my radical stance on Christian Science develop the longer I was exposed to its doctrines?

Page 167 of the above-named book reads, "Only through radical reliance on Truth can scientific healing power be realised." Radical reliance was our benchmark in the search for healing. The longer my mother was exposed to radical reliance, the more her eyes became lifeless. She marched to the beat of a different drum and gradually became lifeless before our eyes.

Does it matter? Apart from her immediate family, who cares? Why am I writing this, today? Well, something happened recently to cause me to think carefully. As a second generation Christian Scientist and never having owned my own personality, to what extent has my brain been affected by radical belief? Having left Christian Science, have the seeds of radical reliance remained in my brain? Has my radical reliance polarised into a radical stance against it? Is being radical, whatever the cause, sown within my personality? And, inadvertently, have I become radical, again, in my opposition to Christian Science?

My strong-mindedness over leaving Christian Science has been brought into question and it really poses a deeper question. Who am I? I am an ex Christian Scientist. To deny being "ex" or "former" or "previously" is to deny who I am and what I stand for. It does not prevent me from moving forward and being thankful to be alive but it identifies me.

Mere musings. Is there anyone out there who was radical in their Christian Science belief? How does your exit from it affect your opinions and life, now?

Sunday, 6 October 2013

Winter Reading?

There are quite a few books written by former Christian Scientists which must help and validate a reader who may be in the process of extricating himself from Christian Science. "The 'Crime' of Dorothy Sheridan" by Leo Damore approaches the dilemma of medicine v faith healing, parental rights etc from a different angle.
It is a true story, features the Christian Science church and describes the courtroom drama as the facts unfold, concerning the death of Dorothy Sheridan's young daughter.

As I look back on my childhood life in Christian Science I know that I am indeed fortunate to be sitting here, on a sunny morning, enjoying my life. Being a member of the Christian Science church and having a mother who radically relied on CS meant that, as my childhood years developed, my mother had absolutely no idea of when sickness became an emergency and requiring action. We had no doctor, nobody to advise us and were surrounded by Christian Scientists from whom permission had to be extracted, to even visit a dentist when in pain!!! 

A Christian Scientist may suggest that it proves Christian Science "works" because I never became life-threateningly ill. Cold comfort for all former members who watched suffering and deaths of relations and endured needless pain of their own! Shocking, that the law (UK) did not and does not protect children because of the beliefs of their parents. When does a health crisis become same? Or, is CS radical reliance - Mrs Eddy's requisite for healing -  swept under the radar as being a thing of the past?? Is Christian Science wearing new clothes in the twenty-first century?

So many questions!  Serious reading.

Sunday, 25 August 2013

Bargain books!

We have several copies of "The Religion that Kills - Christian Science: Abuse, Neglect and Mind Control" by Dr Linda S Kramer  Sale price £4.75 (includes postage within UK) Please e-mail me at ex_cs2001@yahoo.com   if you are interested!

This is written by a former Christian Scientist who introduces the reader to the world of Christian Science thinking and also discusses "mind control".

Wednesday, 24 April 2013

A Christian Science childhood

I also recall breaking my arm when I was very young. I regained consciousness after my fall to see my parents' heads leaning over me and to hear them both bitterly arguing as to whether I should be taken to the hospital (my father's wish) or whether to call a Christian Science practitioner (my mother's wish). I was in a lot of pain and couldn't stop crying. Overnight, the pain was unbearable and I was still crying the next morning....  I shall post more on this saga, later.

 I can commiserate with Ben's memories over his brother's broken arm.

As a young child, we studied Christian Science for at least an hour, sometimes two hours, every morning. It was miserable for me, as I could hear all my friends playing outside. They had given up knocking on the door and asking me to join them! It all served to effect an isolationism from people around us.

Does anyone else recall a childhood in Christian Science?

Ben's Story

The main belief of the group I grew up in (Christian Science) was that we should not use doctors or medicine in order to maintain our health. As a child, this became a frightening situation to be in, as I gradually realised the danger this presented to my health.

My father left the group when I was six. Shortly afterwards, when my brother broke his arm, my mother initially refused to take him to a doctor. My brother cried while my parents argued over the action to take. My brother was treated the following day, when his tears did not stop. My parents' difference of opinion was a continuing source of conflict for many years, that almost led to divorce.

Apart from a very painful and persistent bout of earache that went untreated, I was fortunate enough not to suffer any major illnesses that might have put my life at risk. Our family was, however, isolated by the extreme nature of our beliefs, and by the absolute denial of illness which the group expected from us.

Membership involved Bible study and the study of the group's own texts (Science and Health by Mary Baker Eddy). We were expected to study for more than an hour each day. Occasionally, I heard conversations that alluded to the deaths of people in the group who were sometimes younger people or children.There was a constant feeling that I was not properly protected.

As a teenager, I refused to attend the group, which led to enormous conflict with my mother, for many years. My mother eventually died in hospital, after initially refusing medical treatment for a heart condition. It has been very disturbing to realise, as an adult, that my childhood medical neglect was an abuse of parental power.

Sunday, 17 March 2013

Interesting Reading

Some more titles for your library:


Christian Science        Women, Healing, and the Church   by Deidre Michell

A Collision of Truths  A Life in Conflict with a Cherished Faith   by Robert Y. Ellis

Fathermothergod   My Journey out of Christian Science    by Lucia Greenhouse

For the Love of God      Lawrence w Gold, M.D.

Breaking Their Will    Shedding Light on Religious Child Maltreatment     by Janet Heimlich

When Prayer Fails    Faith Healing, Children, and the Law


We will try to write some book reviews soon!  Check out the books already listed on this blog!

Saturday, 16 March 2013

At Last!

There is some help, based in London, for people who are or were in cults or high demand groups. Free Minds UK is concerned with cult recovery and awareness and is an education/support group.
Please email me for more details, if you are interested.